Our Christian Home

*************************************

Grace Lutheran Church
Mission Statement

To ANSWER the CALL of our Savior.
To CONNECT with people in their everyday lives.
To ADVANCE the Gospel through God’s Word and fellowship.
To LEND ourselves in service, so that we may become instruments.
that LEAD others to salvation..

 

2024 Grace Lutheran VBS June 23-26


Preregister at luthyouth.com/vbs or glcna.org
Volunteer at luthyouth.com/vbs
T-Shirts must be preordered by June 16. at luthyouth.com/vbs

*************************************


WEEKLY DEVOTION MAY 21

Tuesday, MAY 21, 2024

Pastor Bruce Kischnick, Grace Lutheran Church, New Albany, IN

“Preach the Word”

READING: II Timothy 4:1-5 – In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who will judge the living and the dead, and in view of his appearing and his kingdom, I give you this charge: Preach the Word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke, and encourage – with great patience and careful instruction. For the time will come when men will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear. They will turn their ears away from the truth and turn aside to myths. But you, keep your head in all situations, endure hardship, do the work of an evangelist, discharge all the duties of your ministry.

Until I was in the seventh grade at St. Michael’s Lutheran School, Richville, MI, our pastor was Pastor Schoenow. Pastor Schoenow confirmed and married my mom and dad, baptized me, and missed confirming me by one year. He served a little over 30 years in that community. He was a good and caring pastor, loved and respected by the congregation. But I must confess that I do not remember a single sermon I ever heard him preach. I seem to remember listening to twenty or thirty minutes of him droning on without ever an illustration or story on which to hang the theology he was teaching. Now, some of it may have been my youth. Kids are not always equipped to learn the lessons being taught in our sermons, but some of it was also the training our pastors received in those days. I have heard professors and other pastors refer to it as “Dead Orthodox Preaching” – it was doctrinally pure, but dry as toast.

Now lest you think me picking only on Pastor Schoenow, think again. When I became an adult, serving the church as a teacher and principal, I heard plenty of “Dead Orthodox Preaching” from pastors much younger than him. They preached perfectly doctrinal, orthodox sermons, but most Sundays I walked out of the church and could not have told you what the sermon was about – and I was theologically trained and aware. There just was nothing on which to hang that theology. I could not relate it to everyday life and living. And there are still plenty of preachers out there who do much the same thing.

I have much preferred sermons that use illustrations to help us remember and relate the lessons being taught to the life we live the other six days of the week. I think that’s exactly why Jesus taught so often with parables and illustrations from the everyday life of his hearers. He talked about vineyards and wheat fields, weddings and banquets, fishing, winnowing, and orchards. He taught heavenly lessons with earthly pictures. That’s what I try to do as well.

I think of it in this way: a sermon should have as it’s main course “The Faith”, that is the application of our Christianity to our everyday chores, responsibilities, and relationships. It should help us live as the people of God with our families, our friends, and the people we meet. Then “Theology” should be the nice big piece of dessert that tops off the meal. We pastors want the laity to be knowledgeable and familiar with the doctrines that underly our Faith. That should be an important part of the sermon, but not the main course. When the sermon’s main course is “Theology” and maybe, “if you’re good” you get a dollop of the “Faith” in its everyday application, the sermon becomes a heavy, hard-to-digest meal that often fails to teach or satisfy.

Now, in our reading for today St. Paul warns young Timothy to be aware of the pitfalls of the pastor’s life: if he preaches just to entertain and please the “itching ears” of his hearers, he will be failing in the Lord’s calling. If the preaching delves into myths and psychological babble, if the preacher avoids preaching God’s law and speaking the truth about what God expressly names as sin, if the preacher aims for fame and accolades, then the preacher fails in his high calling and God will hold him accountable.

Paul calls on all Christian preachers to: “preach the Word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke, and encourage – with great patience and careful instruction.” The three resources the preacher has are: the Word, the Sacraments, and the Holy Spirit. The tools to employ those resources are the training, the experience, and the personality he has received by God’s grace. In a world that less and less desires God’s unshakeable truth, his wisdom, and his Lordship, it’s never been more important for our pastors to be faithful men, winsome men, and men of ability. As Grace gets serious about finding a new Associate Pastor to serve our congregation, these are some of the important considerations we want to keep in mind. Call a man to preach God’s word in truth and love the Lord’s people, then love that man and support him in every important way. Always and in all ways our aim is to live together in the Faith and serve God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

PRAYER:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

1) Pastor Woods will be on a much needed and well-deserved vacation the week of May 27-June 3. He has begun preparations for V.B.S. and so can use our help. He will be in the gym most Tuesday and Wednesday evenings. Come give him your help in whatever time you are able.

Youtube Video: https://youtu.be/MIAHAXftB5s

PRINTABLE PDF: WDMay21.PDF

[email protected] — (502) 797-7407

*************************************


WEEKLY DEVOTION MAY 20

Monday, MAY 20, 2024

Pastor Matthew Woods from Grace Lutheran Church in New Albany, Indiana

“The Places You Will Go.”

It’s graduation season. You know what that is. It’s the transition time where one milestone in our lives gives way to the next. It’s a mixture of relief, accomplishment, and disorientation. Over the years we have seen our kids grow up. Their parents have held them, changed their diapers, fed them, shared hundreds of pictures on Insta-Tweet-Snap-Faceplant—Tik-Tumblr, and other online connections; we’ve been to your practices, paid your school dues, and fines, stayed up late after practice to get the science projects done, dragged you through Confirmation, and much more; been to countless matches, doctor’s visits, plays, games, and recitals, ceremonies and bought the yearbooks. We have watched our grads grow from little critters to young adults. We have argued with them, supported them, felt sad for them, frustrated for them, but love them and hold a deep sense of pride in them. And we at Grace feel a deep sense of gratitude in being included in their lives. And we hope whether you graduating from college or from high school that the places you go will always be a walk with Jesus.

No amount of bubble wrap, helmet wearing, filtered watering, phone tracking, nor lip smacking can prevent life from happening for any of us. As Jesus says, we are sheep among the wolves. But we are sheep who have a powerful Shepherd who goes with us wherever we go. And Jesus wants us to go places because wherever we go the Gospel can be heard. And let’s just say it; the world needs Christians to share the Gospel more than ever. It needs you to believe in Jesus.

In Matthew 10 Jesus is sending the disciples out for a trial run. It’s a kind of short internship of sorts—maybe weeks or months long. Jesus gives them very specific directions. Vs 5 “Do not go among the Gentiles or enter any town of the Samaritans. Go to the lost sheep of Israel. As you go preach this message: “The kingdom of heaven is near.’ Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the leper, drive out demons. Do not take any money with you. Take no bag for your journey, or pack extra clothes.”

To go only to the lost sheep of Israel meant that the disciples could focus on their fellow Israelites for now as they practice their preaching. The message was specific to the Jews, “The Kingdom of heaven is near” would immediately bring to mind the Messiah. They are given authority to heal people and do what Jesus has been doing. And they were do depend on their hosts for food and care which would build within them a sense of trust in the Lord.

But what if these disciples decided to do there own thing? How then would they have learned to trust in the Lord? What if the disciples changed the message to make themselves the most important thing? What if they said, “The Lord is here to bless you with success and comfort. You are free to do anything you want because Jesus will forgive you anyway?” What if the disciples misused their authority to heal the sick and heal the leper and used such miracles only for themselves, as personal trophies to get themselves noticed on Instagram or the Jerusalem evening news—to be famous? What if it they always worried what people thought of them and instead of shaking the dust from their feet from the towns that rejected them, choosing instead to make people happy? What if, rather than preach the truth about sin and the need for Jesus they didn’t say anything at all?

Thankfully, the disciples followed the Lord’s instructions, and learned to trust in Jesus, and make a real difference in the world by preaching the Gospel. This is our pattern. We win when we don’t go our own way which is tainted by sin. What’s more we learn to trust Jesus in real life situations. We see faith in real life. The Lord wants us to succeed more than anyone at life. His Word gives us direction that is designed for all the places we go to be places that bless us.

There are some places we should not go. Just because we live as sheep among the wolves does not mean we have to play by the rules of the wolf. The sheep’s job is to follow the shepherd not go where the wolf tries to lure us.

The greatest danger of the wolf is his ability to sneak up on us, to get into our heads, to diminish our courage, compromise our faith, bully or corner us into rejecting the Bible, wound us in our spirits, and if he can take us down. The wolves will tell you “that your parents lied to you; the church lied to you; your pastor lied to you. Jesus is not real. His Word is not truth. You get to decide your own moral code, your own beliefs. Christianity is dangerous, crazy. The Church is just a bunch of hypocrites and liars, fakes, frauds.”—By the way if that is true then they are calling our families frauds too.

There is always intense pressure in the present and the future to abandon Jesus, to condemn the Bible’s teaching and to make us more uncomfortable in expressing faith in public and make the church look more irrelevant and a stupid, as a boring waste of time. I pray that you would remember us here at Grace better than that. But remember the wolf looks at sheep only as a meal, an asset to gain for itself. It does not care for the sheep. It will pretend to care for as long as it serves the wolf’s purpose. The hardest part for a young Christian or even a seasoned one is to know where the wolves are.

A story is told of the man walking down the street who dropped a quarter into the tin cup being held out by a man wearing dark glasses and holding a sign reading, “Help the poor blind man.” After taking a few steps, the donor turned around and was shocked to see the “blind man” remove his dark glasses and peer into the cup. The donor hurried back and angrily declared, “You’re not blind!” to which the “blind man” replied, “No, sir, I’m not. The blind man’s on vacation, and I’m just taking his place. I’m usually the deaf-and-dumb man on the next street.”

What’s worse, being deceived, becoming angry at this pretender, or the idea that may creep into our head that helping people isn’t worth it or that they are all just taking advantage of us? How about none these options. The wolf gets a hold of us by stoking our emotions, anger and fear being the most powerful. However, if we play the Shepherds game, we didn’t give to a blind man for us to feel good or calm some hidden guilt. We give to honor the Lord. That’s a much different mindset. We saw a need and acted in love for Jesus. What happens after that isn’t why we give. I’m sure that some who were healed by Jesus wanted to be healed more than then they wanted Jesus. Even now, many want love and blessings of Jesus, but not Jesus, and certainly not the obligation of following Jesus.

Joshua1:5 tells us three times, “Be strong and courageous.” By doing so Joshua was a success. Playing the Shepherds game keeps the impact of the wolf to a minimum while at the same time making us stronger the next time the wolf makes another attack. Actually following the Word and putting into practice what it teaches will distinguish us from the wolves. But that requires you to believe that its that important. And no one can do that for you. It’s hard work to believe in Jesus and even harder to actually follow His Word. Jesus doesn’t promise easy. He is very clear about what it means to follow Him. But He is also clear about what you gain by following Jesus. You will have a distinct advantage over this world. You have a church family that loves you and wants the best for you. You will have an eternal hope that keeps you going and life after this world in the resurrection of Jesus.

Look, if I have a cure for cancer and I believed it would work with all my heart what kind of person would I be if didn’t advertise it; urge people take it and give it to everyone. I can’t make them take it. But how do they even have a chance if I don’t at least live up to my belief that it will save people.

You have something that lasts. You have the power of life in Your heart. Jesus is the Good Shepherd who seeks out lost sheep. He even leaves the 99 who are safe to go looking for the one that isn’t. When money, or bragging rights, or health are on the line, we’ll go looking for all kinds of things with a passion. Our prayer today is that we would at least have the same passion for the Gospel of Jesus and bringing that Gospel to the places we go. Because in the end it is the Gospel that brings us to the place we all want to go, to heaven with Jesus.

Pastor Matthew Woods

John 3:30

PRINTABLE PDF: WDMay20.PDF

Youtube Video: https://youtu.be/X-KCuq3hZgg

[email protected] — (502) 523-9327

********************************************************************

*************************************


*************************************


*************************************


*************************************


*************************************


*************************************


***************

WORSHIP SCHEDULE

SATURDAY, MAY 25 — 5:00 PM
SUNDAY, MAY 26* — 8:00 & *10:30 AM
SATURDAY, JUNE 1 — 5:00 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 2 — *8:00 & 10:30 AM
SATURDAY, JUNE 8 — *5:00 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 9 — 8:00 & *10:30 AM
SATURDAY, JUNE 15 — *5:00 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 16 — *8:00 & 10:30 AM
SATURDAY, JUNE 22 — 5:00 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 23 — 8:00 & *10:30 AM
SATURDAY, JUNE 29 — 5:00 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 30 — 8:00 & 10:30 AM
* = Communion

*************************************

 

For more information (Your Bulletin) check out
NEWS & TIDBITS at the top right box

 

*************************************

 

For more Devotions check out THIS WEEKS DEVOTIONS
at the top right box

 

For more Devotions check out RECENT DEVOTIONS
at the top right box

 

*************************************

 

CHECK OUT BAPTISM – OBITS

 

*************************************

 

gracelogo2


*************************************

 

IMG_8979

 

For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith – and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God – not by works so that no one can boast. — Ephesians 2:8-9

Welcome to the Grace Lutheran Church and School web site. There is a variety of information here regarding our congregation and our beliefs. Lutherans are Bible-believing, sacramental Christians who trace their roots back to Martin Luther and the Protestant Reformation. There have been Lutherans since 1517, particularly in Germany and Scandanavia. Lutherans in America followed large immigrations from Europe in the 1840’s and 1850’s.

The congregation at Grace was founded in 1927 in a small room over a pool hall on State Street in New Albany. The congregation moved to Tenth and Oak, then to Charlestown Road, before building its current facilities on Klerner Lane in 1974. The congregation now numbers just over 1100 souls. We worship at 8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. on Sundays and at 5:00 p.m. on Saturday evenings. The pastors are Rev. Bruce Kischnick and Rev. Matt Woods.

 

Grace Lutheran Church
Mission Statement

 

To ANSWER the CALL of our Savior.
To CONNECT with people in their everyday lives.
To ADVANCE the Gospel through God’s Word and fellowship.
To LEND ourselves in service, so that we may become instruments.
that LEAD others to salvation.

 

Rev. Bruce Kischnick, Senior Pastor

[email protected] — (502) 797-7407

Rev. Matt Woods, Associate Pastor

[email protected] — (502) 523-9327

 

Rose Ebling, Part-time Interim Youth Director

[email protected] — (502) 442-1474

 

Mitzi Lyon, Family Life Director

[email protected]

 

Helen Bohannon, Music Director

[email protected]

Georgianne Weathers, School Administrator (812) 941-1912

E-Mail: [email protected]
[email protected]
www.gracelutheran.school

 

Karen.Meredith, Church Secretary

[email protected]